This is an antique German Junghans time and strike spring driven clock made in the style of a Vienna Regulator. As I mentioned previously, it came to me as a box of parts. To some a box of clock parts and pieces is discouraging but to me it is a challenge.

This is Part III of a three part series on my newly acquired Junghans Crispi wall clock.Β 

This is Part III of a three part series on my newly acquired Junghans Crispi wall clock.Β  In Part I described the circumstances by which I came across this clock and it’s incredible story as a survivor of the Halifax Explosion on Dec 6, 1917. In Part II I walk the reader through the servicing of the time and strike movement.

Pieces everywhere
Pieces everywhere

Β The movement is in exceptional condition despite the fact that it is very dirty

I discovered that the movement is in exceptional condition despite the fact that it is very dirty. I put the movement aside and decided to attend to the case as the first step in this project. As I mentioned in Part I, I ordered some trim pieces / parts and I am awaiting their arrival. In the meantime I can work on refreshing the case.

The first photo shows the case just after a soap and water cleaning. I use Murphy’s Soap exclusively, it does a very good job of cleaning. It eliminates the scum and build-up of dirt and grease over the years and allows me to see the original finish. I can then decide how to address further work on the case.

In the next photo the right final that my wife is holding on the crown is actually a bottom left or right finial since the top requires somewhat taller finials that I do not have but have ordered from a supplier.

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It is important when using stain that the excess be wiped off after about 20 minutes to minimize buildup and to speed drying.

In the next photo I have applied 2 coats of Mission Oak stain to the lighter parts of the clock. At east one or two further coats are required. Stain is easy to work with and simple to apply with a small flat half inch artist brush. It is important when using stain that the excess be wiped off after about 20 minutes to minimize buildup and to speed drying.

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After two coats of stain and checking how the dial and pendulum would look like

I arranged the pendulum and dial in the case to visualize how it will look once finished. The dial is enameled and exceptionally clean and free of cracks, marks or abrasions. The brass bezel and pendulum have been cleaned up with Brasso and show very well.

After the 3rd coat
After the 3rd coat

It looks like the choice of Mission Oak stain was the correct decision

After the third coat of stain to the unfinished sections of the frame, the case is looking more even in colour. It looks like the choice of Mission Oak stain was the correct decision.

Bracket returned to the case
Bracket returned to the case, gong is in the wrong location

I cleaned the movement bracket and returned it and the coil gong to the case. In the above shot you can see where the new pieces are nicely matched colour-wise to the older sections of the case.

In this next shot you are actually looking at the case turned upside down. These two finials were cleaned up, given a light coating of stain and are re-attached.

Bottom finials
Bottom finials are re-attached
Bottom centre finial
Questionable bottom centre finial

The amateur woodworker before me decided that since there was only one tall finial it should go on the bottom.

The bottom centre finial was attached to the case when I got the clock but in my view it is too long and should be on the crown section of the clock instead. I believe that the amateur woodworker before me decided that since only one tall finial survived, it should go on the bottom. I will leave it in place for the moment and wait till I see it on the wall before deciding whether to replace it with a shorter finial or I may just trim it a little shorter.

An oak spindle that I bought at a hardware store for $5 did the trick

The top crown requires left and right bases for the finials which I crafted out of an oak spindle that I bought at a hardware store for $5.

Oak spindle
Oak spindle, an excellent source for wood trim pieces

Here is one of the bases with one coat of Mission oak stain. Once it is dry it will be attached to the left or right side of the crown and the finial will be mounted on top of it.

Base piece for top crown finial
Base piece for top crown finial

Next is attaching the bases to the left and right sides of the crown and designing a centre support post for the crown, yet another use for the oak spindle. The centre post is also the anchor point for the centre top finial.

Location of left finial
Location of left crown finial
Finial bases are test fit
Finial bases are test fit
Centre crown support post
Centre crown support post fashioned from the oak spindle

I am trying to determine if the clock ever had wall stabilizers? Normally they are attached to the bottom left and right of the case with two anchor screws (for each stabilizer) as you can see in the next photo.

Stabilizer on a single weight Vienna wall clock
Stabilizer on a single weight Vienna wall clock

Given that the clock is 41 inches tall it seems very likely that it did have them originally although I see no sign of old screw holes. Perhaps it didn’t.

Hanger re-installed
Hanger re-attached

I have re-attached the case hanger. Purists, please ignore the Robertson screws which were employed by the previous owner when he rebuilt the case. I might replace them with Flathead screws but it is what it is and I can live with it if I don’t.

On the wall
On the wall
Decorative nails polished
Movement and dial out of case and decorative nails polished

In the first photo I show the movement attached movement (still not serviced at this point) to the bracket hanger, put the hands back on and attached the pendulum. In the second I have taken the movement our for servicing but have taken all the decorative nails off, gave them a polish and re-attached them. There are still some small trim pieces missing in these last two shots as well as parts of the crown piece notably the finials. And of course there is no glass. I am checking out old windows suppliers in the local area to see what they have in classic wavy glass appropriate to the period.

At this point there have been no significant setbacks. All is proceeding as planned.

 

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