After not having visited my sister in some time I was surprised to find that she is an avid clock collector. I must stress the word collector because although she appreciates the beauty of each clock she has acquired over the years how they run is somewhat of a mystery to her and that is just fine. While visiting her this summer three of her clocks were out of adjustment and it took no time (no pun intended) at all to get them running again. No sense paying someone to do it, that`s what brothers are for.

In my opinion the most interesting clock she has is a French time and strike bracket clock that has no visible markings yet appears to be over 100 years old. It is in beautiful condition with only a slight patina on the finish. I would love to have found out more about this clock but my stay was brief. Perhaps next time.

French bracket clock
French bracket clock

The next clock is one my sister absolutely loves and it is a great sounding Westminster chime grandmother clock she bought some 20+ years ago. This quarter chime clock made by Craftline Industries in the early 1990s has a Canadian made case with a German movement, likely by Hermle.

Craftline grandmother clock
Craftline grandmother clock

Next is a curiosity. When I saw the Sessions name on the dial I wondered why I had not seen this particular style of Sessions clock. Further investigation revealed it to be a six pillar Adamantine Seth Thomas case. The movement was clearly marked ST and as I said the case is certainly a Seth Thomas. So, why the Sessions clock face? Likely the original dial face was so badly marred as to be unreadable that the owner many years ago simply told the clock repair person to find another face, which he did. Since the replacement was a Sessions electric clock face he had to drills the holes to accommodate the winding arbors. Who would know! To those less knowledgeable it looks great.

Session Seth Thomas mantel clock
Sessions / Seth Thomas mantel clock

I found this little antique time-only Hamilton and Co. French-style carriage clock made in India (Calcutta) to be very interesting and so diminutive. Hamilton and Co. is probably the best known and most celebrated British clock maker in India. I would put this clock at around the 1890s. It probably needs a good cleaning since it is not in working order.

Hamilton and Co Calcutta
Hamilton and Co. Calcutta

I am not a huge fan of steeple clocks but this Waterbury clock is in very good condition save for a damaged right steeple tip. The Waterbury Clock Company is one of many 19th century Connecticut-based clock firms with a history going back to the 1850s though it closed is doors for good in 1944. More memorable are Waterbury wall and mantel clocks but like many makers of the day they had a successful line of steeple clocks.

Waterbury steeple clock
Waterbury steeple clock

Next is a New Haven time and strike tambour style mantel clock from about the late 1920s or early 1930s. Aside from the grandmother clock which my sister bought new the New Haven mantel clock was a wedding gift of her late husband’s parents and has been in the family ever since.

New Haven Mantel clock
New Haven Mantel clock

Lastly, this Chelsea ship’s bell clock is a polished beauty. A ship’s bell is used to indicate the time aboard a ship and hence to regulate the sailors’ duty watches. Unlike normal clock bells, the strikes of the bell do not correspond to the number of the hour. Instead, there are eight bells, one for each half-hour of a four-hour watch. Three bells, for example, would mean that a sailor would be 1 1/2 hours into a 4 hour watch. Each watch would take its turn with the essential activities of manning the ship’s helm, navigating and keeping a lookout.

Chelsea ship's bell cloc
Chelsea ship’s bell clock

I was quite impressed with my sister`s collection and each clock occupies a special place in her home. I find it facinating going into peoples homes and discovering the joy they experience in collecting, be it clocks in this case or anything for that matter. Collectors are truly unique people!

 

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