Pequegnat wall clock
Canadian Time clock by Arthur Pequegnat

The Canadian Time clock was made by the Arthur Pequegnat Clock company. The Arthur Pequegnat Clock Company (1904–1941) is notable as the longest lasting Canadian-based clock manufacturer.

My particular clock was made after 1917 and was made in Kitchener, Ontario (Canada). Clocks made before 1917 were inscribed “Berlin” on the dial face. Kitchener was known as Berlin prior to and during the first World War. It was the town of Berlin from 1854 until 1912 and the City of Berlin from 1912 until 1916. Because the name Berlin was associated with the war against Germany the decision was made to change the name to Kitchener midway through the First World War. Kitchener is the present seat of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Ontario.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Label affixed to back of clock

Unfortunately, the precise year that my clock was manufactured is unknown, however the Canadian Time series was made right up to 1941. By 1941, the demands of World War II armament makers for brass, the essential ingredient in clock movements, pressed the Arthur Pequegnat company to stop production. If my clock was made in 1941, it’s age would be 72 years.  There are no actual markings on the movement indicating the year it was made.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Checking on condition of the clock

It has Arabic numbers as most were ordered with Roman Numerals. Being a railway clock Arabic numbers would have made it easier to read by common folk in a train station. One could order the clock from the manufacturer with either Arabic or Roman numerals. In addition one could also order a time / strike / calendar version of this clock.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Crossed horseshoes
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
On prominent display in my home

I have seen only one other clock with the cross horseshoes that you can see in one of the photos so they were likely added after the clock was made.

I am trying to locate a photo of the clock while it was hanging in the Pictou, Nova Scotia train station prior to the station’s decommissioning in the early 1990s. If I can locate a photograph it would help me date the clock more accurately.

The clock is quite large measuring  37 inches high, 5 inches deep and 15 inches across and made of quarter-sawn oak that results in boards with the annual rings mostly perpendicular to the face yielding greater stability with less warping.

The Canadian Time clock is a reasonably accurate clock and is indeed a testament to the quality and care that went into the crafting of this fine timepiece.

Advertisements